Early Detection of Breast Cancer

Early Detection of Breast Cancer

Infrared Imaging can identify early signs of angiogenic processes

A revolutionary new method for early detection of neoplastic processes in the human breast—breast cancer—combines high-resolution functional infrared imaging with analytical software and facilitates meta-analysis of the extensive database facilitates identification of the “signatures” associated with physiological abnormalities in the breast.
The infrared imaging systems described in the Yannacone patents can provide substantially more clinical information about abnormal physiologic activity  at an earlier stage in the evolution of neoplastic (cancerous)processes in the human breast than any of the static anatomical images provided by X-ray mammography, whether film or digital, or the other breast imaging systems presently available.
The non-invasive screening modality and, if necessary, the non invasive localization modality localization modality of the infrared System in the Yannacone patents does not expose patients to ionizing radiation or subject them to any of the pain and discomfort that characterizes X-ray mammography.
According to a recent National Cancer Institute (NCI) study, X-ray mammograms can miss an average of 20% of the breast cancers that are present at the time of screening and up to 50% of the cancers present in the denser breasts of women in their 40’s and younger. Additionally, X-ray mammography has a significant false positive rate.
Despite well-publicized claims to the contrary, a recent NCI study found that there is no difference in breast cancer detection rates between the older film-based X-ray mammography and the newer digital systems. In early testing, however, systems based on the Yannacone patents detected tumors and other breast anomalies with accuracy greater than that of X ray mammography, and with a considerably lower number of false positives.
A unique combination of sophisticated mathematical procedures to process and analyze a series of images of the infrared radiation emanating from the skin surface that result from physiological responses within the breast tissue in response to a thermal challenge created by a moving stream of room temperature air over the surface of the breast can identify and characterize statistically significant changes in the physiological response of the breast tissue.
Additionally, each time a patient has a infrared mammography examination, it can be compared to the patient’s previous exams stored the database and any changes between the current exam and any prior exams can be detailed.
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