Cyberlaw

Cyberlaw

involves more than just software contracts and employment agreements.
Much as Environmental law became an enterprise-wide concern of American business since the 1970s, Cyberlaw should now be an enterprise-wide concern of every business using the Internet in any way.
Cyber attacks have become an almost daily event affecting all sizes and types of businesses. The rapidly expanding supply chain supporting the cybercrime economy is empowering cybercriminals, cyberterrorists and even nation-states in ways that put companies, critical infrastructure and governments at increased risk.
Whether based in Russia, China, Africa, the United States or anywhere else on the globe, organized syndicates are leveraging the anonymity provided by the web to garner wealth from the sale of malware kits capable of penetrating the most well-protected databases and computer networks. Sophisticated criminals armed with innovative technologies are an immediate and major threat to American business and the American Free Enterprise System.
Cyberthreats are escalating and business trade partners and consumers are insisting on safeguards for their private information. It is vitally important for businesses and their law firms to understand the actions needed to maintain cybersecurity and the insurance coverage necessary to cover the damages from cybersecurity breaches.
Victor John Yannacone jr. is an advocate, trial lawyer, and litigator practicing today in the manner of a British barrister by serving of counsel to attorneys and law firms locally and throughout the United States in complex matters. He has been continuously involved in computer science since the days of the first transistors in 1955 and actively involved in design, development, and management of relational databases since his landmark DDT litigation in 1966. In 1969 he pioneered in the development of environmental systems science. During the Agent Orange litigation (1979–1984) he designed and developed the first successful real-time relational database for medical records which eventually established that exposure to dioxin-contaminated herbicides during the war in Southeast Asia was responsible for a complex constellation of diseases for which combat veterans are finally being compensated.